Christmas Tree Recycling

Once the mince pies have lost their appeal and the turkey is gone the one thing left to remind you of a good Christmas is your real tree. But what to do with it once the festive period is over and the needles are starting to drop? Have no fear as you can recycle your Christmas tree at Ogden Water. Each year Calderdale Countryside Services receive thousands of trees, some that have their roots cut off and others potted. No matter what the state of your tree they can use it.

Trees can be left outside the visitor centre/classroom and then a hardy bunch of volunteers work the trees, removing branches down one side and placing the cut trees into a brash layer surrounding the reservoir. This thick layer adds a dash of colour during January, but has a number of other advantages. The layer prevents anyone from accessing the water – helping to keep people safe while still enjoying the site. It also creates a habitat that is used by birds, mammals insects and plants to breed, grow and develop over the coming year.

Any trees that are donated with roots on are planted around the estate in areas that would benefit from wind protection or in need of thickening up with firs & pines. Trees can be dropped off until the end of January and there are a number of days planned for people to help put the trees out around the reservoir, for more details please email chris.sutcliffe@calderdale.gov.uk

Christmas Tree Recycling

Once the mince pies have lost their appeal and the turkey is gone the one thing left to remind you of a good Christmas is your real tree. But what to do with it once the festive period is over and the needles are starting to drop? Have no fear as you can recycle your Christmas tree at Ogden Water. Each year Calderdale Countryside Services receive thousands of trees, some that have their roots cut off and others potted. No matter what the state of your tree they can use it.

Trees can be left outside the visitor centre/classroom and then a hardy bunch of volunteers work the trees, removing branches down one side and placing the cut trees into a brash layer surrounding the reservoir. This thick layer adds a dash of colour during January, but has a number of other advantages. The layer prevents anyone from accessing the water – helping to keep people safe while still enjoying the site. It also creates a habitat that is used by birds, mammals insects and plants to breed, grow and develop over the coming year.

Any trees that are donated with roots on are planted around the estate in areas that would benefit from wind protection or in need of thickening up with firs & pines. Trees can be dropped off until the end of January and there are a number of days planned for people to help put the trees out around the reservoir, for more details please email chris.sutcliffe@calderdale.gov.uk

Ogden Water Practical Day – 19 July

Help manage the reserve and get involved with controlling vegetation around the area on Thursday 19 July – Meet 9.45am at the Ogden Water classroom

Please contact Chris on 07769 954956 for further information.

Up & down from Ogden Water – Guided Walk

Meet Chris Sutcliffe outside the Ogden Water visitor centre for a 6 mile, medium grade walk over hill and dale taking in the south and eastern countryside – Sorry no dogs

Thursday 14 July – Meet at 10.30am

Please take your own lunch and contact Chris on 07769 954956 if you require more information.

Discover the Watery Worlds of Ogden

Delve into the stream and ponds around Ogden Water and come face to face with the many beasts that live there.

Saturday 2 July

Please contact Chris on 07769 954956 for further information.

Practical Day at Ogden Water

Get your hands dirty and help manage the reserve, making repairs to the reservoir fencing and brash layer.

Tuesday 21  June – 9.45am (Meet at the Ogden Water classroom)

Please contact Chris on 07769 954956 for further details.

Take the Norland Moor Visitor Survey

Norland MoorCalderdale Countryside and Woodlands Service are conducting a visitor survey on Norland Moor over the summer and autumn to find out what people do on Norland Moor, how often they visit and what (if any) things they would like to alter about the way the moor is managed.

Click here to take the short survey today!

The information gathered will be used to help decide how best to manage the moor in the future. The survey is the first stage, followed by a series of focus groups to zoom in on issues faced by different user groups.

After all this has been completed, a management plan will be produced for the moor taking to account people’s views before the final document goes out to consultation during spring/summer 2016.